A seasoned performance coach and change management expert, Susan Mahoney guides leaders to make better decisions and achieve better outcomes with a strategic, inquisitive, diagnostic approach. Whether she’s working with the c-suite of a global organization, emerging leaders or influential stakeholders, she diagnoses and prioritizes performance issues by asking incisive questions and challenging assumptions. Through this process, Susan works with organizations and individuals to ultimately make the tough, internal disruption decisions necessary to implement relevant solutions to close performance-related gaps. During her more than 25 years in the performance improvement industry, Susan has helped hundreds of people and organizations achieve their potential. She has worked with leading global organizations to implement strategies to improve sales performance, strengthen management and develop leaders.

Facing Your Resistance To Change And Moving Past It

By: Susan Mahoney I consider myself an agent of change. I’ve spent most of my career as a consultant, helping organizations improve sales results via some kind of change in training, coaching, technology, or leadership. For these interventions to deliver results, the people involved also need to change their beliefs, practices, and behaviors. However, most people…

This Mindset Shift Can Make You A Sales Coach

By: Susan Mahoney When companies train sales managers to be more effective coaches, more of their reps meet their sales quota and revenue increases, according to the Association of Talent Development. This correlation alone should be enough motivation for companies to train sales managers to be coaches. However, in my experience, most sales managers have…

You Need To Know How To Diagnose A Revenue Gap

By: Susan Mahoney In his book, “When Breath Becomes Air” neurosurgeon Paul Kalanithi discusses an informal diagnostic practice he developed with a fellow surgeon in the stress of the trauma room. They would use the size of a state’s population to summarize the severity of a head injury. For example, one patient may be a “Wyoming”…